What are reasons for cash register shortages?

Employee Theft

One method of employee theft, known as “banking,” consists of building a pile of paper clips or “spare change” indicating cash in the till from shortchanging customers. Each instance adds some amount to the “overage” in the till and at the end of the shift the cashier keeps the extra money. This can work by hiding prices from trusting customers who may be in too much of a hurry to notice anything or not providing receipts for purchases. Even when customers know the price, they may not pay enough attention to the change or do the math to figure out how much change they are due.

POS Voids

Cashiers can manipulate the POS by voiding legitimate sales to steal money; one telltale sign is if higher-than-average transaction voids start to appear during a specific employee’s shift.

Skimming

Skimming is another contributor to cash loss. Knowing that managers tend to overlook small discrepancies, an employee will skim amounts off the top just low enough to avoid suspicion. Sometimes, the cashier isn’t the direct beneficiary of theft at checkout. “Sweethearting” consists of giving too much change to friends and family, not charging for certain items or charging a lower amount for a complete transaction.

To learn more about best practices for preventing employee theft, download our white paper below:

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How do I prevent employee theft at the POS?

Want to learn more about how do you detect employee theft? Most employees are honest, but those who steal do so for a number of reasons. A common reason is an opportunity. Presented with the opportunity to take what is not theirs, some people are willing to risk the consequences if they believe the likelihood of getting caught is minimal or non-existent.

But available opportunity is only one motivation. Some employees steal out of need. Perhaps they are financially strapped themselves or are looking to help a friend or family member experiencing hardship. In some cases, stealing feeds a drug or alcohol addiction.

Disgruntlement also plays a role. An employee who feels undervalued, underpaid or just outright disrespected may give in to the temptation to steal from his or her employer. They use common rationalizations to justify the crime. To learn more about best practices for preventing employee theft, download our white paper below:

Retail Cash Loss Landing Page Picture

How do employees steal at the cash register?

One method of employee theft, known as “banking,” consists of building a pile of paper clips or “spare change” indicating cash in the till from shortchanging customers. Each instance adds some amount to the “overage” in the till and at the end of the shift the cashier keeps the extra money. This can work by hiding prices from trusting customers who may be in too much of a hurry to notice anything or not providing receipts for purchases. Even when customers know the price, they may not pay enough attention to the change or do the math to figure out how much change they are due. Download the white paper below to learn more about preventing theft at the point of sale:

Retail Cash Loss Landing Page Picture